Fire Safety During The Hurricane

If you want to reduce the risk of fire, you have to make sure of all restrictions on smoking and the use of open flames. Always keep your smoking materials in a safe place and put them rightly.

You may not live in a particular hurricane-prone area but you might be on alert during some time of the year. The unsuspecting area can still be impacted by strong summer hurricanes. So it can be helpful for you to know about storm safety.

Before a Storm Prepare Your Home

Emergency lighting

During the evacuation time, your immediate need is transportation and shelter. Evacuees focused on escape. You should also remain careful of fire safety by making a special effort to protect against any accidental fire.

Power can be cut out during a storm and you may need to resort to backup lighting options. If possible, use flame-free alternatives to candles. You can use flashlights or battery-powered lights.

If you use candles for whatever reason make sure to avoid carrying them from room to room. Be careful about the open flame from getting caught in the wind or posing other safety risks.

Emergency lighting
Operate generators safely

Operate generators safely

Keep the generator outside and away from your house or other buildings. This will reduce the danger of carbon monoxide entering your house. It’s also smart to let your generator turn off and cool down before refueling it since gasoline can ignite on hot surfaces.

Do not try to power the house with a generator by back-feeding which can be a dangerous mistake and could overload circuitry, burning down your home. Operate generators in outdoor places where people don’t go. Make sure you are working away from all doors, windows.

You can choose a vent opening space. Lock the generators in a space so that exhaust fumes cannot enter homes or other building openings. Do not refuel your generator while it is running. Turn off your generator and wait some time for cooling then refuel it.

The generator gets extremely hot and will cause severe burns if you do not handle it with caution. Do not store gas or flammable liquids in your home.

Take shutters down between storms

Shutters up may make your home less safe in a fire. Shutter down hampering the first responder’s from entering your home.

Your best bet is to take them down and hope that you don’t need to put them back up for a long time. Safety is always the number one priority.

Take shutters down between storms
Use of Candles

Use of Candles

Keep candles at least 1 foot away from things that can catch fire, like clothing, books, and curtains. Use sturdy candle holders that won’t tip over easily, are made from a material that cannot burn, and are large enough to collect dripping wax.

Keep candles and open flames away from flammable liquids. Never leave candles or kerosene lamps burning unattended or within the reach of small children or pets. Extinguish all candles when leaving home or going to bed.

Small tips, More safety

Tape does not prevent windows from breaking. Bring in all outside furniture, decorations, garbage cans, etc. Turn off propane tanks.

Put copies of important documents in a waterproof, portable container in an easily accessible location.

Small tips, More safety
Grill smart

Grill smart

You may be cooking outdoors moreover in an open flame. You must follow the safety guidelines of using a grill, like keeping your hair and clothing away from the open flame when you are preparing food. After finishing your work, make sure to turn off the flame.

Fire Safety During Transit

During the 2005 Hurricane Rita, Texans experienced vehicle-related fires. Vehicles have highly flammable materials that can easily catch fire. To reduce the risk of fire, you should take some small steps that can be helpful

  • Follow all restrictions about smoking and the use of open flame. Always extinguish smoking materials in a safe method and location.
  • When transferring gasoline from one container to another make sure there is no leakage.
Fire Safety During Transit
What to Do After a Storm?

What to Do After a Storm?

  • Careful when you are going out of the house and Be ready for broken glass, damage to building foundations, streets, and bridges, and coastal or hillside erosion.
  • Stay away from downed power lines.
  • Keep listening to radio, TV, and weather radio all alerts.
  • Watch out for closed roads. If you come upon a barricade or a flooded road turn around and go back to a safe place.
  • If you reach a safe place, do not return to your home until local authorities say it is safe.
Fire Safety at Evacuation Center
  • CLocate the closest fire extinguisher for advanced safety.
  • Locate exits (at least two) and ensure they are unlocked and not blocked.
  • Exercise caution when using candles and alternate or portable methods for cooking, such as camping stoves. Use those in a well-ventilated area.
  • Keep combustible materials (especially paper and cardboard boxes) away from open flames.
  • Make sure electrical circuits are not overloading the electrical devices.
Fire Safety at Evacuation Center
Avoid Carbon Monoxide Poisoning!
Avoid Carbon Monoxide Poisoning!

Several people affected by hurricanes Katrina, Rita became sick and died from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. CO, a shapeless, colorless gas that can cause sudden death. Carbon Monoxide is found in combustion fumes produced by the gasoline engines that power portable generators.

Carbon monoxide from these sources can build up in enclosed or semi-enclosed spaces, poisoning the people and animals that breathe near it. Portable generator use is widespread after natural disasters and it is the main cause of carbon monoxide poisoning. You can prevent carbon monoxide poisoning by -

Never use generators, grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline, propane, natural gas, or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, basement, garage, or camper-or even outside near an open window.

Every year, 2,000 people die of CO poisoning and 15,000 others need medical treatment because of it. CO poisoning is a real threat. It’s a killing machine that you cannot see, smell, or taste.

We hope that today’s blog helps you stay safe during the storm season. Contact us and visit our website- http://firesprinklertx.com/